“In other words, that’s a 50% increase in likelihood you will be sexually assaulted, and all you have to do is join the BDSM community”

NCSF

The National Coalition of Sexual Freedom (NCSF), a BDSM Scene front (i.e., public relations) group, recently published results from a survey about consent. According to the group’s Executive Director and recently-hired FetLife.com Community Manager, Susan Wright, one of its key findings is that, in her own words, “over 30 percent of [over 5,000 respondents] have had their previously negotiated limit violated.”

For a community that proclaims itself to generally be a safer place to explore sexuality than the traditional (“vanilla”) populace, a community whose entire foundational ethos is “safe, sane, consensual,” this is kind of a disaster.

Thomas Millar put it this way:

So … this is very, very bad. Of kinksters responding to this question, 30% had had a prenegotiated limit violated. Those numbers are even worse than victim self-reports of rape in the general population; which the New York Times reports as about 20% based on a study supported by the National Institute of Justice.

Communities ostensibly based on consent, with more consent violations than the general population.

If both the 20% figure from the Times’ report Thomas cites and the NCSF’s own survey results are accurate, and they may not be exact for many possible reasons, then there are 50% more consent violations in the BDSM Scene than elsewhere.

In other words, that’s a 50% increase in likelihood you will be sexually assaulted, and all you have to do is join the BDSM community.

Enjoy your next munch.

Found at Pomeranian Privilege, all links in her post (including to a pdf download of the report). The original is here, by a person who, if I’ve read their blog(s) correctly (and I haven’t spent that much time on it), is a ‘kinkster’, who is anti-BDSM, or at least anti-Dominants, a distinction I wouldn’t recognise, so I imagine they would not find my blog compatible with theirs.

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8 responses

  1. [Deleted at commenters request]

  2. I’m don’t think it’s correct to analyse the numbers in that way and treat the probability as if it were cumulative. Both the statistics for the BDSM ‘scene’ and for the general population are for life-time occurrences – 30% of the BDSMers interviewed reported a violation at some point in their ‘BDSM lifetime’ and 20% of the general population reports being raped in their lifetime – not the risk of any specific place.

    Even if we do interpret it in that way, as the BDSM ‘scene’ being a place with a certain risk factor, I still don’t think your interpretation is correct. If a dangerous road had a 1 in 10 chance of being hit by a car when crossing, the risk is 1 in 10 every time you cross.

    You are right that some one who spends any time in the BDSM ‘scene’ is exposing themselves to a higher risk in that time than if they had been anywhere else, but that is not what the studies above were measuring.

  3. Could you please delete that previous comment of mine? I made a big calculating error and used a bad example. Here is a more true version:

    Considering that the 20% is for all the hours of a human life up to the moment of the question being asked, and the 30% is for only the hours spent in the BDSM community, the difference between an hour in the world most people experience and an hour in the BDSM community is huge.

    If the average respondent from whom that 30% number is received spent as much as 4 hours per week (out of 168) in the “kink” scene, and have done so for half their lives, they spent one hour of every 84 of their existence doing BDSM. If that one hour in 84 combines to being a time when they had 1-and-a-half times as much chance of being raped as most people are over the 84-times-as-much time in the “normal” world (a world which can sometimes be grotesque in itself), then an hour in the BDSM world would be 126 times as dangerous as an hour in the “normal” world.
    I don’t know the numbers of how much time people spend in BDSM, but as it is much less than 100% of the time since birth, that 1-and-a-half times as much chance of being raped in BDSM is actually an astronomical per-hour difference.

  4. First of all, I don’t think you can make such generalisations about the time people spend ‘at risk’, as the 20% figure is lumping together stranger rape, intimate partner rape, women who were raped at university, women who were raped on holiday etc etc. A women who lives alone is not at risk 24h a day.

    Also, regarding BDSM, what about couples who are into BDSM? The victim could be spending 24h a day with the perpetrator if neither of the couple leaves the house to work.

    And I’m still not sure if risk actually accumulates/concentrates/inflates in the way you are describing.

    I’m no expert, and would be more than happy to be proven wrong if you can link to an online text book or some such.

  5. Neo Ex Machinae

    By the by: “previously (agreed-on) limits violated” does NOT NECESSARILY MEAN RAPE. (Not that this “study” has been validated or backed up by any cross-data.) It could be that they got two extra swats than they agreed on. That they wound up altering those “soft limits” as their scene went on. Limits being violated is not a good thing, but get past that word “violated”. A parking ticket is also considered a “violation”. It’s all in the context. Once again, inflammatory excerpts. God, get me out of here.

  6. Sure, the comparison isn’t perfect, but the point is, BDSMers always claim that their ‘community’ is better than the ‘mainstream’ because of ‘safe, sane and consensual’, and that abuse is always stamped out in a flash because of ‘safe, sane and consensual’; an in-house survey where 30% of respondents say something bad has happened to them doesn’t look very good.

    You do realise you’re shitting on a survey carried out by BDSMers, right? Why would people lie? Do you think people (women) often lie about being violated? (Here’s a hint, if you do, you are a misogynist rape apologist).

    As for ‘validation’ and ‘cross-data’, I call disingenuous bullshit, what is there to cross-check against except police records? Are you aware of how few people (women) report sexual violence against them to the police? That the police can intimidate the victim into withdrawing their complaint, record it as ‘no crime’, botch the investigation?

    Do you think researchers have the resources to send out teams of private investigators to ‘validate’ every survey response they receive?

    The Crime Survey for England and Wales, a much respected piece of research used by the UK government, relies on people responding to questionnaires, not on sending out teams of private investigators, so you are demanding a completely impossible level of proof.

    (And yes, the survey above was not carried out to the same scale or level of robustness as The Crime Survey for England and Wales, my point is simply that responses to questionnaires are a valid source of data.)

  7. […] against the community for covering up instances of sexual assault, and as it turns out, there are many instances. It makes sense that careless, abusive, misogynistic people would be attracted to, and take […]

  8. […] against the community for covering up instances of sexual assault, and as it turns out, there are many instances. It makes sense that careless, abusive, misogynistic people would be attracted to, and take […]

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