Daily Archives: July 23rd, 2018

Tell the BBC ‘pimp’ is not a synonym for ‘good’

The BBC news website recently published an article about customised prosthetics and equipment for people with disabilities, titled ‘Pimped-up and ready to go’.

I have sent the following complaint to the BBC:

A recent article about customised prosthetics used the term ‘pimped-up’ in its title; a pimp is someone who uses psychological manipulation and/or physical violence to control someone in prostitution. Language matters, the BBC has a duty to use language responsibly; by using ‘pimp’ to mean good or improved, the BBC is normalising and trivialising violence. Even if one of the organisations featured in the article uses the word ‘pimp’ in that way, that is not an excuse for the BBC to do the same.

Please feel free to copy or adapt the above (adaptations are better), you can complain to the BBC here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/complain-online/

QotD: “Why syphilis and gonorrhoea have returned to haunt Britain”

“You often get them late afternoon on a Friday. If somebody doesn’t want to go home, that’s when you get these conversations,” says Alison Hamnett, director of operations across the north for Brook. They may start with asking for free condoms, but eventually the real story emerges: sexual exploitation, abusive relationships, precarious lives. Girls who don’t even feel entitled to refuse sex, let alone insist on protecting themselves.

Some are guarded. “Particularly if they are being groomed, they will have the answers to the questions down pat,” says Hamnett. “But the receptionist will say she saw a car outside drop them off – and the same car is coming with lots of young girls …” Posters hanging in the waiting room of the Manchester clinic where we meet explain the difference between exploitative and loving relationships: no, it’s not OK if he offers a roof over your head and expects sex in return.

The Burnley, Blackburn and Oldham clinics tend to see more grooming-gang victims, says Hamnett. In Liverpool, she found them dealing with a young homeless man, released from prison, who had been having sex in broad daylight in a car park while intoxicated. Manchester saw a young Muslim girl who was being radicalised. The checklist used with clients ranges from female genital mutilation to mental health issues. “We had a young woman of about 17, very intelligent, got all her A-levels and went to university,” says Hamnett. “She was bipolar and, when she was on her meds, she was great. When she wasn’t, she’d sell herself for sex.” The clinic helped her until she was too old to use its service, which is restricted to under-19s. They don’t know where she is now.

Brook’s expertise is in this area – where sexuality, deep-seated social problems and mental health issues collide – and is, says Hallgarten, what makes them “very good value for money”, as identifying the root cause of sexual risk-taking offers more chance of changing it.

But specialist clinics for vulnerable young people such as these are increasingly merging with more general services to save money. There is a push, says Hamnett, towards using GPs instead for contraception. That may work for young people with happy sex lives, but there is a reason appointments here last for up to 40 minutes, not the 10 minutes a busy GP might offer. “I feel as if we’re almost waiting a few years down the line for teenage pregnancies to go up,” she says ruefully. It is this sense of a clock being turned back that worries many.

Dangerous liaisons: why syphilis and gonorrhoea have returned to haunt Britain